News

In the wake of natural disasters across the state, the Missouri AFL-CIO has created the Missouri Working Families Relief Fund to send a message of hope and solidarity to working people in need.

A proposed constitutional amendment to make Missouri a “Right-to-Work” state is being challenged by a lawsuit filed today in Cole County Circuit Court.

Billionaire Elon Musk is slated to host Saturday Night Live this weekend, and AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler (IBEW) is calling his infamous labor practices and anti-union tactics anything but funny. “Musk has used his social-media megaphone to spread misinformation about COVID-19, endanger employees’ health and violate their organizing rights.

The PRO Act is about as important a piece of labor legislation as we’ve seen in some time. It holds the potential to open the door for workers and organizers to step up and reverse 40 years of losses for organized labor. The law, whose initials stand for Protecting the Right to Organize, aims to do just that: protect workers from being harassed or fired if they try to organize a union or if they try to help their already existing union become more active in their workplace. This is seen as the number one legislative priority for organized labor.

Before we even find out if Elon Musk can do comedy, we know this: Letting him host “Saturday Night Live” is a joke.

In 2019, 5,333 working people were killed on the job and an estimated 95,000 died from occupational diseases, according to the 30th edition of Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect report released today. That means every day, on average, 275 U.S. workers die from hazardous working conditions. And this was before the devastating COVID-19 pandemic that has been responsible for far too many worker infections and deaths in our country.

On Tuesday, a jury found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd. While many in the labor movement were quick to commend the verdict, we also know that the work of racial justice must continue.

José Acevedo served in the U.S. Army before teaching high school history in New York City. After being stationed in the Panama Canal Zone from 1974 to 1977, he spent the next 30-plus years teaching ninth and tenth grade and became a member of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT).

On Friday, AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler celebrated the House passing the Workplace Violence Prevention for Health Care and Social Service Workers Act (H.R. 1195), which directs the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue a federal workplace violence prevention standard to protect workers in health care and social services from injury and death:

Lisa Pedersen of Revere, Massachusetts, has been a United Steelworkers (USW) member for 34 years. As “the first girl in [her] area” when she started as a gas leak investigator and repair person for the National Grid, Pedersen is used to being a leader. She is now a “working leader” at the National Grid, and her union loyalty and leadership instincts have particularly shone during the past couple of years.